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June 30, 2015

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

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Oxygen deprivation (from the treadmill) + bad play (from the television) = my mind has some problems.The Final Wager – June 30, 2015

First and foremost, I want to apologize to Adrian for getting his name wrong in the video. As you can imagine, I didn’t feel like recording this afresh after I was done.

Second: did anyone want to win this game? Sure didn’t seem like it.

Brandon

Powell

Amy

Hollis

Adrian

Perez

12,400 6,200 11,600

Still, someone’s going to win (and probably bring a total lack of aggression to Wednesday’s game) based on this category:

FAMOUS WOMEN

Let’s get this over with.

First-order calculations

Second doubles up

If Adrian doubles his score, he’ll have 23,200.

To cover this all-in wager, Brandon will need to wager 10,800.

Brandon
Amy
Adrian
12,400 6,200 11,600
10,800 11,600
23,200 23,200
min max min max min max
10,800

An incorrect response with that wager will leave Brandon with 1,600.

To stay above his total, Adrian can wager up to 10,000.

Amy can wager up to 4,600.

Brandon
Amy
Adrian
12,400 6,200 11,600
10,800 4,600 10,000
1,600 1,600 1,600
min max min max min max
10,800 4,600 10,000

Third doubles up

A successful doubling will put Amy at 12,400.

To cover this, Adrian should wager at least 800.

Brandon could wager at most 0. Now things are getting spicy.

Brandon
Amy
Adrian
12,400 6,200 11,600
0 6,200 800
12,400 12,400 12,400
min max min max min max
10,800 4,600 10,000
800
0

Amy would need to wager at least 4,600 against Adrian, and things are even spicier. (She could also wager everything – not a dollar less – if she fears a zero out of Brandon.)

Brandon
Amy
Adrian
12,400 6,200 11,600
4,600 800
10,800 10,800
min max min max min max
10,800 4,600 4,600 10,000
800
0 6,200

Here’s where things stand after the first order:

Brandon
Amy
Adrian
12,400 6,200 11,600
FIRST-ORDER SECOND-ORDER COVER ZERO
min max min max min max
10,800 4,600 4,600 10,000
800
0 6,200

Second-order calculations

Third’s max vs. first

If Amy goes for that 4,600 wager, Brandon could wager up to 1,600, and Adrian up to 800 – hot, hot, hot!

Brandon
Amy
Adrian
12,400 6,200 11,600
1,600 4,600 800
10,800 10,800 10,800
min max min max min max
10,800 4,600 4,600 10,000
1,600 800 800
0 6,200

 

Adrian should wager at least 2,400 to cover that possibility from Brandon.

Brandon
Amy
Adrian
12,400 6,200 11,600
FIRST-ORDER SECOND-ORDER COVER ZERO
min max min max min max
10,800 4,600 4,600 2,400 10,000
1,600 6,200 800 800
0

Zero wagers

Score differences:
Brandon and Adrian: 800
Brandon and Amy: 6,200
Adrian and Amy: 5,400

Brandon
Amy
Adrian
12,400 6,200 11,600
FIRST-ORDER SECOND-ORDER COVER ZERO
min max min max min max
10,800 4,600 4,600 2,400 5,400
1,600 6,200 800 800
0

Then we add a dollar to the minimum wagers, and subtract a dollar from the maximum wagers.

What actually happened

Brandon Amy Adrian
12,400 6,200 11,600
11,000 6,200 4,600
23,400 12,400 7,000
min max min max
10,801 4,600 ! 2,401 5,399
1 1,599 6,200 ! 800 !
0 !

All right, so not quite so bad here. But again, someone had to win.

Brandon has now won 2 games and $38,788.

The Final Jeopardy! clue

FAMOUS WOMEN
ON JANUARY 5, 1939, IN A LOS ANGELES PROBATE COURT, THIS NATIONAL HEROINE WAS DECLARED LEGALLY DEAD
Correct response: Show
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2 Comments
  1. avon1144@gmail.com permalink

    Kevin, has anyone missed the single jeopardy daily double clue, two double jeopardy daily doubles, and the final jeopardy clue and locked out their opponents like Brandon did yesterday?

  2. Aaron Fisher permalink

    This video was amazing in ways that are hard to describe. I think it’s just the relatability of trying to do arithmatic with an uncooperative brain.

    Whether it’s from a runner’s high, from sleep-affecting medication, or just from pure exhaustion, it’s funny how the first thing to go always seems to be number identification and arithmetic. Maybe that’s just my own observation, but it seems way easier to take a derivative, for instance, than to subtract 22 from 111.

What do you think?