Skip to content
March 27, 2015

Papal Pandemonium: Quarterfinal #7

Papal Pandemonium 2015
Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 Results

For more info on Popes, visit New Advent's Catholic Encyclopedia

You guys apparently like the “fictional character” Popes! Linus and Felix flew through to the next round, with Eleutherius picking up the third slot in Thursday’s battle.

We’re nearing the end of our prelims. The semifinals will start next Tuesday; before then, we have three more nonets to sort through.

Today’s match-up is very much unlike the rest: 8 of the 9 names have been used multiple times.

Papal Pandemonium quarterfinal 7

Choose your three favorite papal names.

    Victor (38%, 13 Votes)

    Urban (56%, 19 Votes)

    Paschal (21%, 7 Votes)

    Innocent (65%, 22 Votes)

    Gelasius (24%, 8 Votes)

    Formosus (26%, 9 Votes)

    Eugene (29%, 10 Votes)

    Clement (24%, 8 Votes)

    Alexander (12%, 4 Votes)

Total Voters: 34

Loading ... Loading ...

Alexander – used 7 times (last: 1691)

Derivation: Greek, defender of men

I II III IV V
105–115 1061–1073 1159–1181 1254–1261 antipope
VI VII VIII
1492–1503 1655–1667 1689–1691

Alexander VI, born Roderic Llançol i de Borja, broke his vow of celibacy and had several children – including a daughter named Lucretia. (You might know their last name better as the Italian Borgia.) Martin Luther was not a fan.

Clement – used 14 times (last: 1774)

Derivation: Latin, mild, merciful

I II III IV V
88–97 1046–1047 1187–1191 1265–1268 1305–1314
VI VII VIII IX X
1342–1352 1523–1534 1592–1605 1667–1669 1670–1676
XI XII XIII XIV
1700–1721 1730–1740 1758–1769 1769–1774

Speaking of famous families, Clement VII was a Medici.

Eugene – used 4 times (last: 1447)

Derivation: Greek, well-born

I II III* IV
655–657 824–827 1145–1153 1431–1447

Early in his tenure, Eugene III issued a papal bull calling for the Second Crusade.

Formosus (891–896)

Derivation: Latin, good-looking

Formosus was the victim of perhaps the most bizarre episode in papal history: the Cadaver Synod. In 897, Pope Stephen VI had Formosus’s body exhumed and placed on trial for usurpation of the throne. He was found guilty, his papacy was annulled, and his body was thrown into the Tiber.

Stephen VI quickly became unpopular; he was soon strangled. Successive popes reversed his findings and banned posthumous trials.

Jean Paul Laurens, 1870. Le Pape Formose et Etienne VI - Concile cadavérique de 897"

Jean Paul Laurens, 1870. Le Pape Formose et Etienne VI – Concile cadavérique de 897. (Wikipedia)

Gelasius – used 2 times (last: 1119)

Derivation: Latin, laughter

I II
492–496 1118–1119

The first Gelasius was born in Africa; he argued that since his power was derived from God, it trumped that of any king.

Innocent – used 13 times (last: 1724)

Derivation: Latin, innocent

I II III IV V*
401–417 1130–1143 1198–1216 1243–1254 1276
VI VII VIII IX X
1352–1362 1404–1406 1484–1492 1591 1644–1655
XI* XII XIII
1676–1689 1691–1700 1721–1724

Innocent I was probably the son of his predecessor, Anastasius I.

Paschal – used 2 times (last: 1118)

Derivation: Latin, of Easter or Passover

I II III
817–824 1099–1118 antipope

Antipope Paschal III went head-to-head with the legitimate Alexander III.

Urban – used 8 times (last: 1644)

Derivation: Latin, city-dweller

I II* III IV V*
222–230 1088–1099 1185–1187 1261–1264 1362–1370
VI VII VIII
1378–1389 1590 1623–1644

Urban VII was Pope for just 12 days – the shortest of any consecrated Pontiff. During that time, he managed to ban the use of tobacco in church (under threat of excommunication, of course).

Victor – used 3 times (last: 1087)

Derivation: Latin, conqueror

I II III* IV IV
189–199 1055–1057 1086–1087 antipope antipope

Victor I was the first African pope, hailing from outside of Tripoli, Libya.

There were two Antipopes named Victor IV, both of whom “served” in the 12th century.

Leave a Comment

What do you think?