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March 24, 2015

Papal Pandemonium: Quarterfinal #4

Papal Pandemonium 2015
Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 Results

For more info on Popes, visit New Advent's Catholic Encyclopedia

Congrats to our latest three winners: Boniface, Severinus, and Miltiades. (The first two had comfortable leads; the last edged out Pius.)

In our fourth quarterfinal, we move from the old-school names into some much more… generic monikers. (All placements were done randomly.)

As before, one-third of these 9 names will move on to the next round. You have until midnight Eastern to cast your votes!

Papal Pandemonium quarterfinal 4

And now, a little bit about our contestants!

Adrian – used 6 times (last: 1523)

Derivation: from the town of Adria, Italy (related to Adriatic).

I II III IV V
772–795 867–872 884–885 1154–1159 1276
VI
1522–1523

Adrian has the same root as Hadrian, the name of the Roman Emperor who built the wall separating present-day England and Scotland.

Adrian IV was the only English pope, born Nicholas Breakspear.

Adrian VI was the only Dutch pope, and the penultimate pope who maintained his name upon election to the papacy. (The last, Marcellus II, would ascend in 1555.)

Agatho (678–681)

Derivation: Greek, kind, good.

Agatho might have been over 100 years old when he became Pope. Known as Thaumaturgus (“the Wonderworker”) for his many miracles, Agatho is venerated in both the Western and Eastern churches.

Celestine – used 5 times (last: 1294)

Derivation: Latin, heavenly.

I II III IV V
422–432 1143–1144 1191–1198 1241 1294

Until Benedict XVI did so in 2013, Celestine V was the last pope to resign. He had been a hermit until he was elected to end a two-year interregnum; he was unfamiliar with the political nature of the position, and longed to return to monastic life.

Instead, he was imprisoned by his successor, Boniface VIII, who was afraid rivals would install Celestine as an antipope.

Constantine (708–715)

Derivation: Latin, steadfast.

Traveled to Constantinople to meet with Emperor Justinian II; along the way, he named bishops in several random towns, as it was rare for a pope to go so far from home.

Cornelius (251–253)

Derivation: Latin, war horn.

Elected against his will, Cornelius was, unsurprisingly, martyred.

Martin – used 3 times (last: 1431)

Derivation: Latin, war-like (related to Mars).

I II III IV V
649–655 not used not used 1281–1285 1417–1431

After Martin I was captured by Byzantine Emperor Constans II, he was marched through the streets of Constantinople while citizens heaped insults upon him. He was ultimately subjected to exile.

The two popes named Marinus were mistaken for Martinus, and given numbers II and III; this was later corrected, and the numbers left unused.

Paul – used 6 times (last: 1978)

Derivation: Latin, little, humble.

I II III IV V
757–767 1464–1471 1534–1549 1555–1559 1605–1621
VI*
1963–1978

Paul VI closed the Second Vatican Council (Vatican II) and accepted many of its findings. He was beatified by Pope Francis in 2014.

Soter (166–175)

Derivation: Greek, salvation.

Possibly the first pope who wasn’t martyred, Soter inaugurated the celebration of Easter as a Roman holiday.

Stephen – used 9 times (last: 1058)

Derivation: Greek, crown.

I II III IV V
254–257 not used 752–757 767–772 816–817
VI VII VIII IX X
885–891 896–897 929–931 939–942 1057–1058

This is going to get confusing. The man who would have been Stephen II died before consecration in 752, so whether he should count toward the numbering is a matter of debate. Numbers weren’t used for popes until the turn of the millennium, so the last Stephen was the only one to sign a number, and he used Nonus.


Cast your vote!

Choose your three favorite papal names.

    Stephen (14%, 5 Votes)

    Soter (17%, 6 Votes)

    Paul (23%, 8 Votes)

    Martin (17%, 6 Votes)

    Cornelius (46%, 16 Votes)

    Constantine (37%, 13 Votes)

    Celestine (63%, 22 Votes)

    Agatho (29%, 10 Votes)

    Adrian (31%, 11 Votes)

Total Voters: 35

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One Comment
  1. Rafferty Barnes permalink

    Adrian IV gave Ireland to the English, and I’m STILL BITTER.

What do you think?