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January 17, 2014

Daily analysis, Friday, January 17

Will we close out the week with a dose of sanity? Please!The Final Wager - January 17, 2014

Sarah finds herself trailing for the first time heading into Final. This time, a 4,000 wager won’t work. Will she still do it, as commenter Kelly suggested yesterday?

Sarah McNitt: 13,200
Jen Aprahamian: 1,600
Geoff Norcross: 24,500

The Final Jeopardy! category: AMERICAN THEATER

Before we get into the actual situation, I want to talk about the penultimate clue, worth $2,000. No one buzzed in, so the scores were the same as above.

With these scores, if you can do some quick math in your head, you’ll see Geoff needs $1,900 to lock up a victory. With such a large lead, there’s no downside if he gets it wrong – he’ll still only lose if he misses Final and Sarah gets it right. Therefore, he has to guess.

The nice thing for him is the clue asked for a battle in The Hundred Years’ War. There are really only three battles you’ll need to know for Jeopardy!: Crécy (1346), Poitiers (1356), and Agincourt (1415). Unsurprisingly, all three resulted in devastating French losses.

Agincourt, the battle in question, was fought on St. Crispin’s Day and is the setting for Shakespeare’s Henry V (notice the tie-in with yesterday’s Final!).

Even if you don’t know which is which, you still need to guess. You could say “Calais” in my honor and you’d still be better off than sitting there with your thumbs a-twiddling.

That said, I understand it’s tough to do the math in the heat of the moment. But you need to have your eyes on the scoreboard for the last 10-15 clues, and know that this situation is a possibility.

Final Jeopardy Penultimate January 17, 2014

In the end, the non-guess cost Geoff, as he was the only one to miss Final – and Sarah broke out of her 4,000 mold. (I guess she didn’t want to fall to third, but she left some cash on the table.)

The Final Jeopardy! clue for January 17, 2014 (AMERICAN THEATER):

THIS 1949 DRAMA THAT ENDS WITH A REQUIEM ASKS, “WHY DID YOU DO IT? I SEARCH & I SEARCH & I SEARCH & I SEARCH, & I CAN’T UNDERSTAND IT”

Correct response: What is Death of a Salesman?

2 Comments
  1. Kelly permalink

    There was one reason why Geoff might not go for it – if he got it wrong AND Sarah got it right on a rebound (reasonably possible since like you said only three rational choices) the scores would then be 15,200 to 22,500 putting Sarah within 2/3 of Geoff’s total making it possible for her to win if they both get it wrong. Geoff might have well decided to not risk the crush for a lock.

    • Keith Williams permalink

      I think that’s a bit too much thinking. If Sarah knows it, she’s going to buzz in from the get-go. Note that if she gets it wrong, she’ll be locked out, so there’s no reason for her to guess.

What do you think?